Writing Your Memoir: Dear Love, Dear John, Dear Reader

Instead of creating a traditional narrative memoir, you could decide to present your story as a long letter or a series of letters.  You could either be addressing a single person or group or be addressing letters to the full range of people who have been important in your life so far.  Using letters as a memoir-writing strategy can offer advantages.

James_Campbell_-_News_from_My_Lad_-_Google_Art_Project
News from My Lad, by James Campbell, 1858-1859, Walker Art Gallery – from Wikimedia Commons

Imagining that you are writing to a specific person (a child or grandchild, a friend or spouse, the daughter you never had . . .) or group (your grandchildren, people facing the same challenges you have faced, your former boyfriends/girlfriends . . .) may help you to focus your writing.  By writing directly to a person or group, you will keep that person’s/group’s needs and interests in mind as you compose your work.  Your “recipient”/”recipients” for the letter or letters that become your memoir will, in effect, become a character or characters in your essay or book.  Other readers will enjoy eavesdropping on your one-sided letter-conversation.

Instead of seeing your memoir as a long letter or series of letters to a single person or group, you may want to write separate “letters” to many of the important people in your life, past and present.  These letters can then be compiled and organized into a memoir.  Writing letters to the people who have affected you (for good or ill or some of each) can be powerful.   You will not only be exploring significant parts of your life but also be clarifying for yourself your memories and feelings—from loving and grateful to furious and resentful.  It is, of course, important to avoid libel and to consider whether disguising or even omitting some parts of your story is appropriate.

Here are excerpts from three letters that illustrate what can emerge from “writing to” people who played memorable roles, whether fleeting or long lasting.  In these letters, I address a small girl who became an indelible memory, “talk” to a former boss, and revisit my relationship with a man with whom I was once engaged.  Maybe these excerpts will bring to mind letters you, too, would like to write (for your memoir rather than the mail!).

 

Dear Little Girl,
Do you remember me now?  You seemed to know me then.  I call you “Little Girl,” but you’re almost grown by now, nearly fifteen years after that October day in New York City.  You and your mother were together in a waiting room where my parents and I also sat.  You, a tiny storybook child of two or three, walked over to me and laid your head on my knees, staying beside me until embarrassment seemed to call you back to your mother.
Who was I to you?  To me, you were affection and acceptance, but I’ve wondered since if you were more.  I’ve wondered if you and I were more, more than a chance encounter.  As bizarre as some may think this question: did you remember me from a life before the one we share as strangers now?  Were you my daughter then?
I have longed for you in this life, longed for the daughter who was not to be.  I have felt that I failed, failed to find a husband, form a family, mother a child. . . .

 

Dear _____,
I have been thinking back on the years I wrote for you and their weight in my life.  Let me first recognize that you have admirable qualities as an administrator and boss. . . . I don’t know if you realize, however, how difficult I found working for you.  I would like for you to understand.
I should first explain my views on the right and wrong use of ghostwriters.  A ghostwriter fills a useful and ethical role by helping leaders express their own ideas effectively.  In contrast, leaders who cannot or will not articulate the main points to be conveyed in a book, report, article, blog, or other project are asking their writers to do their thinking for them. . . . While I appreciate your graciousness in acknowledging my role as a member of your team, I wish you had assumed your full share of the teamwork. . . .

 

Dear Sam,
I wonder what life has brought you.  Can you believe we’re now in our 60s?  It feels like just a few summers ago that we met in Dr. Andrew’s course on drama.  He always wore sandals and Bermuda shorts to class.  You were starting your master’s degree in English and would begin teaching in the fall, and I was a semester away from completing my undergraduate English degree.  My hair was long then, and I often wore it in a bun, which you later criticized as severe and proper.  You seemed to like my looks well enough to ask me out, however, and I agreed to your invitation with reluctance.   With your slim height, fine features, and beautiful hair, you could have been attractive. . . .
I remember studying in Millstone Hall one afternoon and seeing you walk by outside.  I’d agreed to meet you but was tempted to disappear instead; I wish I had.  I do find some pleasure in being able to say I was once engaged and had set a wedding date.  (This month we would have celebrated our forty-fifth wedding anniversary in the unlikely event that we had stayed married.)  But when I review our year-long acquaintance in my memory, I experience resentment toward us both. . . .

 

Centre Meeting - pencil
Site of my almost-wedding: Centre Meetinghouse, drawing by Mason Hayek, from Growing to 80

 

If you feel inclined, try jumpstarting your memoir by writing a letter to include in your essay or book.  Will letter writing be the key to your writing and finishing your memoir?

 

Next: Nontraditional memoirs—photographs and drawings

 

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